• Susan Pattis

What Do You Know About the Meaning of Death? (Part VI)

Updated: Nov 6



Millen’s View


I don't know if there is an afterlife. I don't know if I will go to heaven after death, be reborn, or vanish permanently. The meaning of death is far beyond my knowledge and understanding, so I don't think of it that much. Nevertheless, I do know something for sure. One day my life will finish. One day there won't be a tomorrow for me, and my body will stop functioning. Death is the end of this incredible life, so death reminds me to actually live my life! Death is like a warning, always there, right in the back of my mind, telling me that my time here is quite limited, so I must live my life without wasting my time.


Den’s View


Death reminds me that I should be surrounded by the people I love, not those who do not care about me. It also reminds me to enjoy every moment I have now, whether it is part of my rhyme or a completely extraordinary one. Life isn't perfect, but it doesn't need to be perfect to be excellent. Death is the end of my existence and a reminder that my clock is still ticking. So, I better do what I love with the ones I love. Is there something after death? I don't know. But I don't need to worry about that because I'm focused on making the most of my life. Have a nice day, my friends!


Grace’s View


Death is when the life force is permanently separated from the body. The life force is a tiny spark of spiritual substance, thousands of times smaller than the tip of a hair. Due to the presence of this spiritual spark, a body grows and is born. Without the life force, there is no development of human beings. As the body produces the consciousness that is part of the spirit spark or soul, it becomes manifest through the body’s organs. That consciousness is who we are, but we mistakenly think we are the body. The soul stays and adjusts to the body’s changes because the soul is locked together with the body’s organs. We perceive ourselves through our body, and our ability to smell is damaged if the brain is damaged. It is not easy for people on earth to understand the truth because they cannot see the soul's existence.


Nixon’s View


The physical body needs a certain minimum of requirements to function, such as some blood, a pump for that blood, nutrition, filters and other cleaners, an evacuation system for toxins and waste, lungs to provide oxygen, etcetera. When these organs reach a point of failure or collapse, the body can no longer maintain itself. It is a very complex machine, and machines break down eventually. When the body’s engine can no longer sustain life, the soul exits the gross body in its subtle body and is carried by the arrangements of nature to another destination. That is the death of the body. The soul, the person in it, is forced out and taken elsewhere. There is no actual death. Death is when the physical body is left without the soul in it. The body is just dirty laundry once the person has left.


Ward’s View


Suppose we conceptualize time the same way as we think of the timeline of a video file. In that case, it becomes clear that although the experience may seem linear from the first-person perspective of a subject within the universe, from an external point of view, the entire timeline must exist all at once. I believe this is true, leading me to the conclusion: When you die, you are indeed out of time - you can no longer develop your potential. However, despite this fact, you are not 'gone' because your experience exists perpetually within every moment you are alive. Death is the conclusion of this journey on earth, but it is not the conclusion of your experience because you must always experience the life you lived, in every moment, all at once, now and forever.